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Nuclear Medicine // Frequently asked questions

1. What are radiopharmaceuticals?
2. How long does the study lasts?
3. Is the study painful or discomforting?
4. Do I need any preparation?
5. Do I have to take any precautions after the scan?
6. Does the exploration have any side/adverse effects
7. Can I attend accompanied?
8. What if I'm pregnant?
9. Can I breastfeed after a study?

  • 1. | What are radiopharmaceuticals?

    They are radioactive compounds that allow to study the functioning of bodies incorporated into them and emitting a small amount of radiation that is detected by instruments called Gamma camera. The camera Gamma processes radiation transformed it into an image, in different scales of colors which indicate the proportion of arrival of the material to the body, its distribution and elimination.

  • 2. | How long does the study lasts?

    The length is variable according to the type of the requested study. It is generally 30 to 60 minutes. Such as dynamic studies there are tests requiring several shots on the same day or in successive days. In each case he informed the patient promptly when it is necessary to quote him on several occasions. The waiting after injection of the material is also different for each study. For this reason not all patients waiting in the room simultaneously. It may happen that a patient who arrived later than you receives treatment before you do

  • 3. | Is the study painful or discomforting?

    It is not painful. You will be injected the dose of a radioactive tracer into a peripheral vein (usually the fold of the elbow). This will not produce any undesirable effect. You should only stay very quiet during the procedure for it to be accurate.

  • 4. | Do I need any preparation?

    Generally not. In case you need some kind of preparation, will inform properly beforehand

  • 5. | Do I have to take any precautions after the scan?

    Drinking plenty of fluids and try to urinate to favor the elimination of the radiopharmaceuticals or add an additional meal rich in fat if it's a cardiac study.

  • 6. | Does the exploration have any side/adverse effects

    The Gamma Camera does not emit radiation. The radiopharmaceutical used in general is a gamma emitter. For this reason the adverse effects of radiation used are extremely uncommon. The administered dose is similar or less than a conventional radiological study.

  • 7. | Can I attend accompanied?

    Yes, but they should not be children or pregnant women.

  • 8. | What if I'm pregnant?

    You should NOT take part in any exploration with radiation. You must notify us prior to the administration of the radiopharmaceutical if you suspect you're pregnant.

  • 9. | Can I breastfeed after a study?

    if you are breastfeeding you should notify us before the injection, since we use substances that are eliminated through breast milk and can harm the infant.

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